Monthly Archives: December 2016

Congestive Heart Failure: Treatment

Majdi Ashchi, DO, FACC, FSCAI, FABVM, FSVM
Medical Director

Heart failure is a chronic disease needing lifelong management. However, with treatment, signs and symptoms of heart failure can improve, and the heart muscle sometimes becomes stronger. Treatment may help you live longer and reduce your chance of dying suddenly. Depending on the symptoms of patient, a combination of medications maybe used including:

  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. These drugs help people with systolic heart failure live longer and feel better. ACE inhibitors are a type of vasodilator, a drug that widens blood vessels to lower blood pressure, improve blood flow and decrease the workload on the heart
  • Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your heart rate and reduces blood pressure but also limits or reverses some of the damage to your heart if you have systolic heart failure. Examples include carvedilol (Coreg), metoprolol. These medicines reduce the risk of some abnormal heart rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, improve heart function, and help you live longer.

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Congestive Heart Failure: Diagnostic Testing

Majdi Ashchi, DO, FACC, FSCAI, FABVM, FSVM
Medical Director

To determine whether you have heart failure, your healthcare team may do some or all of these diagnostic tests and procedures.

  • Blood tests. a sample of your blood to check your kidney, liver and thyroid function and to look for indicators of other diseases that affect the heart. A blood test to check for a chemical called N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may help in diagnosing heart failure if the diagnosis isn’t certain when used in addition to other tests.
  • Chest X-ray. X-ray images help your doctor see the condition of your lungs and heart. In heart failure, your heart may appear enlarged and fluid buildup may be visible in your lungs. Your doctor can also use an X-ray to diagnose conditions other than heart failure that may explain your signs and symptoms.

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Congestive Heart Failure: Causes and Conditions

Majdi Ashchi, DO, FACC, FSCAI, FABVM, FSVM
Medical Director

Congestive heart failure often develops after other conditions have damaged or weakened your heart. However, the heart doesn’t need to be weakened to cause heart failure. It can also occur if the heart becomes too stiff or does not relax at a certain speed.

In heart failure, the main pumping chambers of your heart (the ventricles) may become stiff and not fill properly between heart beats. In some cases of heart failure, your heart muscle may become damaged and weakened, and the ventricles stretch (dilate or enlarge) to the point that the heart can’t pump blood efficiently throughout your body. Over time, the heart can no longer keep up with the normal demands placed on it to pump blood to the rest of your body.

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Congestive Heart Failure: Signs and Symptoms

Majdi Ashchi, DO, FACC, FSCAI, FABVM, FSVM
Medical Director

Heart failure, sometimes known as congestive heart failure, occurs when the heart muscle doesn’t pump blood as well as it should.  The pump or the ventricle has to be able to pump about 55% of its content with each heartbeat.

Certain disease conditions, such as narrowed arteries in the heart (coronary artery disease or hardening of the arteries) or high blood pressure, gradually leave the heart too weak or stiff to fill and pump efficiently.

Not all conditions that lead to heart failure can be reversed, but treatments can improve the signs and symptoms of heart failure and help you live longer. Lifestyle changes — such as exercising, reducing salt in your diet, managing stress and losing weight — can improve your quality of life. One way to prevent heart failure is to control conditions that cause heart failure.
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Office-Based Cardiac & Vascular Cath Lab

cath-labAshchi Heart and Vascular Center is pleased to announce the opening of its office-based cardiac & vascular catheterization lab in Late-January, 2017 adjoining our University Boulevard location. The state of the art facility is designed to help patients receive quality care outside of the traditional hospital setting.

Patients will now have the flexibility, convenience and control to schedule a variety of cost-effective procedures. Such procedures include: heart catheterizations, simple angiograms and intervention to most complex peripheral vascular procedures.

Ashchi Heart and Vascular Center has acquired one of the best catheterization equipment in the market from Shimadzu, a global provider of medical diagnostic equipment. Its images are second to none with significantly more clear images to provide insight into the patient condition.

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